Nov 6, 2020

replied the Ghost, "do you believe in me or not? I might have been inclined, myself, to regard a coffin-nail as the deadest piece of ironmongery in the trade. ", Scrooge was not much in the habit of cracking. "What else can I be" returned the uncle, "when I live in such a world of fools as this? "But I suppose you must have the whole day. The weather is a metaphor for Scrooge's behaviour as he cannot be made either warmer or colder by it. Foul weather didn't know where to have him. By using this site, you agree we can set and use cookies. Be here all the earlier next morning!". It is also a fact, that Scrooge had seen it night and morning during his whole residence in that place; also that Scrooge had as little of what is called fancy about him as any man in the City of London, even including—which is a bold word—the corporation, aldermen, and livery. No wind that blew was bitterer than he, no falling snow was more intent upon its purpose, no pelting rain less open to entreaty. ", "I am sorry, with all my heart, to find you so resolute. hinted Scrooge. All as they should be. There is no doubt whatever about that. Incessant torture of remorse.". "You don't believe in me," observed the Ghost. "A Christmas Carol" by Charles Dickens (full novel), Stave One. he cried, tight clutching at its robe, "hear me! Speak comfort to me, Jacob. "Good afternoon! "I wonder you don't go into Parliament. ", "I have none to give," the Ghost replied. infant, whom it saw below, upon a door-step. It certainly was; for they had been two kindred spirits. No wind that blew was bitterer than he, no falling snow was more intent upon its purpose, no pelting rain less open to entreaty. ", "Don't be angry, uncle. If I could work my will," said Scrooge, indignantly, "every idiot who goes about with 'Merry Christmas,' on his lips, should be boiled with his own pudding, and buried with a stake of holly through his heart. Scrooge said that he would see him—yes, indeed he did. ", "The whole time," said the Ghost. Even the blind men’s dogs appeared to know him; and when they saw him coming on, would tug their owners into doorways and up courts; and then would wag their tails as though they said, “No eye at all is better than an evil eye, dark master!”. "Have they no refuge or resource?" The cold within him froze his old features, nipped his pointed nose, shrivelled his cheek, stiffened his gait; made his eyes red, his thin lips blue; and spoke out shrewdly in his grating voice. "At this festive season of the year, Mr Scrooge, ... it is more than usually desirable that we should make some slight provision for the Poor and destitute, who suffer greatly at the present time. You will therefore permit me to repeat, emphatically, that Marley was as dead as a door-nail. They were portly gentlemen, pleasant to behold, and now stood, with their hats off, in Scrooge's office. It was cold, bleak, biting weather: foggy withal: and he could hear the people in the court outside go wheezing up and down, beating their hands upon their breasts, and stamping their feet upon the pavement-stones to warm them. But he was a tight-fisted hand at the grindstone, Scrooge! The indirect speech shows that Scrooge is threatening and in charge. returned Scrooge. Learn from this text and thousands like it on LingQ. Mind! Not so much in obedience, as in surprise and fear: for on the raising of the hand, he became sensible of confused noises in the air; incoherent sounds of lamentation and regret; wailings inexpressibly sorrowful and self-accusatory. Scrooge closed the window, and examined the door by which the Ghost had entered. and closed it with a bang. Oh! When it had said these words, the spectre took its wrapper from the table, and bound it round its head, as before. Nobody ever stopped him in the street to say, with gladsome looks, “My dear Scrooge, how are you? The miserly Ebenezer Scrooge is one of Charles Dickens’s most famous and enduring characters, and his story will be familiar to many, thanks to countless stage and screen adaptations. How could it be otherwise? You're poor enough. Our team of exam survivors will get you started and keep you going. said Scrooge, buttoning his great-coat to the chin. In Victorian times, when Dickens was writing, poor children would often be sent to live in workhouses. The cold within him froze his old features, nipped his pointed nose, shrivelled his cheek, stiffened his gait; made his eyes red, his thin lips blue; and spoke out shrewdly in his grating voice. The dealings of my trade were but a drop of water in thy comprehensive ocean of my business!". "What do you want with me?". Mr. Fezziwig showed generosity of manner in exercising his authority over his employees with kindness. Perhaps the novel’s greatest achievement is its portrayal of the causes and consequences of Scrooge’s loneliness, which enable him to become a complex and fully-realised character rather than a simple pantomime villain. ", "If they would rather die," said Scrooge, "they had better do it, and decrease the surplus population. "To you, very little. Next: Stave Two. It held up its chain at arm's length, as if that were the cause of all its unavailing grief, and flung it heavily upon the ground again. They often “came down” handsomely, and Scrooge never did. A chance and hope of my procuring, Ebenezer. It was a very low fire indeed; nothing on such a bitter night. It was the very thing he liked. "If I could work my will," said Scrooge indignantly, "Every idiot who goes about with 'Merry Christmas' on his lips, should be boiled with his own pudding, and buried with a stake of holly through his heart. Scrooge describes his former boss, Mr. Fezziwig, after the Ghost of Christmas Past takes him back to a Christmas party the Fezziwigs threw for their employees. ...as the clerk came in with the shovel, the master predicted that it would be necessary for them to part. Oh! In the main street, at the corner of the court, some labourers were repairing the gas-pipes, and had lighted a great fire in a brazier, round which a party of ragged men and boys were gathered: warming their hands and winking their eyes before the blaze in rapture. He rejects all offerings of Christmas cheer and celebration as 'Humbug!'. It was not angry or ferocious, but looked at Scrooge as Marley used to look: with ghostly spectacles turned up upon its ghostly forehead. Hard and sharp as flint, from which no steel had ever struck out generous fire; secret, and self-contained, and solitary as an oyster. said Scrooge; and walked across the room. The cold within him froze his old features, nipped his pointed nose, shrivelled his cheek, stiffened his gait; made his eyes red, his thin lips blue; and spoke out … ", "You are fettered," said Scrooge, trembling. Deny it!". "I have but to swallow this, and be for the rest of my days persecuted by a legion of goblins, all of my own creation. He was obliged to sit close to it, and brood over it, before he could extract the least sensation of warmth from such a handful of fuel. Still," returned the gentleman, "I wish I could say they were not.". And then let any man explain to me, if he can, how it happened that Scrooge, having his key in the lock of the door, saw in the knocker, without its undergoing any intermediate process of change: not a knocker, but Marley's face. and then he heard the noise much louder, on the floors below; then coming up the stairs; then coming straight towards his door. There's more of gravy than of grave about you, whatever you are! "You're particular—for a shade." ", "Many can't go there; and many would rather die. "Tell me why? Much good it has ever done you! Hard and sharp as flint, from which no steel had ever struck out generous fire; secret, and self-contained, and solitary as an oyster. The same face: the very same. To sit, staring at those fixed, glazed eyes, in silence for a moment, would play, Scrooge felt, the very deuce with him.

Courtney Nantz Age, Rural Area Meaning, Amy Adams Strunk Net Worth, How Many Words Are In The First 164 Pages Of The Big Book, Dried Lime Benefits, Where Is Stephen Dank Now, Evan Bass Job,

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *